Tea Tree Essential Oil

[VRI/NE/01-206]

Extraction Method - Steam Distillation

Certificate - ISO, GMP, Organic, IFRA, FSSAI, Halal

Source - Leaves

(0)
$ 34.69

Botanical Name:  Melaleuca alternifolia Common name:  Tea Tree, Read More

Botanical Name: 

Melaleuca alternifolia

Common name: 

Tea Tree,

Plant family: 

Myrtaceae

Genus: 

Melaleuca

Appearance/Color:

A thin, clear, pale yellow liquid.

Odor:

A middle note with a medium aroma, Tee Tree has a fresh, slightly medicinal scent with characteristic woody, camphoraceous notes.

Blends With:

 Cinnamon Bark, Clary Sage, Clove Bud, Geranium, Lavender, Lemon, Nutmeg, Rosewood, Rosemary and Thyme.

Origin:

China

Source:

Leaves

Method of Extraction

Steam Distillation

 

The main source of commercially produced tea tree oil, Melaleuca alternifolia is an efficacious natural antiseptic once heralded as 'a medicine chest in a bottle'. The genus Melaleuca belongs to the myrtle family (Myrtaceae) and includes about 250 species (including the paperbarks, some of which are cultivated as ornamentals). Most Melaleuca species are restricted to Australia. M. alternifolia bears fluffy, white masses of flowers from spring to early summer, and its narrow leaves help distinguish it from the similar species M. linariifolia, which has wider leaves and flattish-spherical fruits.

Tea tree is a member of a highly aromatic family, the myrtacea family, including myrtle, bay laurel, and sassafras for a start. These plants produce fragrant oils that both speed skin healing and kill off any bugs trying to cause skin infections. Tea tree is an excellent alternative to antibiotic cream and one that should be used to replace those nasty creams. This member of the fragrant family is native to Australia. It was used by the aborigines to treat wounds, cuts and abrasions long before the white man happened onto those shores. When the convicts made their way to the outback, they quickly learned of the wound antiseptic uses of this native plant. Like many other members of the myrtaceae family. A relatively new oil at the turn of this century, tea tree oil gained popularity during the Second World War. It was used by the British Navy to keep wounds from becoming infected. Beyond this, it was used in ammunition factories in Australia to keep workers hands free from infection following factory accidents. Early in this century doctors learned that when one applied tea tree to a wound, it did not become infected.

DISCLAIMER

The complete range of conditions or methods of use are beyond our control therefore we do not assume any responsibility and expressly disclaim any liability for any use of this product. Information contained herein is believed to be true and accurate however, all statements or suggestions are made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding accuracy of the information, the hazards connected with the use of the material or the results to be obtained from the use thereof. Compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local laws and local regulations remains the responsibility of the user.

The FDA has not evaluated the statements on this website. No claims are made by Venkatramna Industries as to the medicinal value of any products from vriaroma.com or by us. The information presented here is for educating our customers about the traditional uses of essential oils and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. You are responsible for understanding the safe application of these products. If you have any questions, please call or email us for further information.

As per NAHA guidelines, New Directions Aromatics (NDA) does not recommend the ingestion of essential oils. It is imperative to consult a medical practitioner before using Essential Oils for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women and those taking prescription drugs are especially advised not to use this product without the medical advice of a physician. The oil should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children, especially those under the age of 7.

Traditionally, the crushed leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia were used by Australian Aborigines to treat skin infections. Today, M. alternifolia is commercially cultivated (especially in north-east New South Wales) for tea tree oil, an essential oil which is used as an antiseptic in skin care products, in the perfume industry, and in soaps and mouthwashes. The oil is effective against bacterial, fungal and viral infections, and is used in products to treat such conditions as athlete's foot, warts, acne and vaginal infections. Tea tree oil is also used for treating respiratory problems, such as asthma and bronchitis.

Tea Tree Essential Oil in Pharma

Tea tree oil was usually used  to treat minor cuts, burns, acne, athlete's foot, mild fungal nail infections, vaginal yeast infections, and lung problems (when they add the oil to a bath or vaporizer). Although there is little research on tea tree oil, some studies suggest that it is safe and often effective for the prevention and treatment of infections. Tea tree oil can kill bacteria and fungi. It comes from the evergreen leaves of the Melaleuca alternifolia tree. Tea tree oil has been used as complementary therapy in surgery, burn care, and dental care. Numerous tea tree oil body care products are available, including soap, shampoo, toothpaste, lip balm, topical (used on the skin) cream, and essential oil.

COMMON USAGE

·        Antiseptic, antifungal, antibacterial

·        Stimulates immune system

·        Colds, glandular fever, cystitis, urinary infections

·        Open blocked noses

·        Chronic and acute infections

·        Gargle for sore throats

·        Douche for thrush and itchy vaginal infections

·        Acne

·        Hair rinse

Ingredients:

S.No

Key Constituents

Strength (%)

1

Terpinene-4-ol

32.0-49.0

2

g-terpinene

11.0-28.0

3

1,8-cineole tr

16.01

4

a-terpinene

6.0-01

5

a-terpineol

1.6-9.0

6

p-cymeme

0.6-7.0

7

a-pinene

1.2-5.0

8

terpinolene

1.6-4.0

9

Sabinene tr

4.3

10

(P)-aromadendrene tr

4.0

11

d-cadinene tr

3.0

12

Ledene (virdiflorene) tr

3.0

13

(P)-limonene

0.7-1.4

14

Globulol tr

2.0

15

Viridiflorol tr

1.0

 

TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Safety Summary

·        Hazards skin sensitization.

·        Cautions Old or oxidized oils should be avoided.

·        Maximum dermal use level 15%

Systemic Effects

·        Skin corrosion/irritation: No Additional Data Available.

·        Reproductive toxicity: Not specified

·        STOT-single exposure: Not specified

·        STOT-related exposure: Not specified

·        Interactive effects Not specified

·        Aspiration Hazard: No Data Available

 

ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION

·        Toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long term adverse effects in the aquatic environment.

·        Results of PBT and vPvB assessment

o   PBT: Not applicable.

o   vPvB: Not applicable.

·        Persistence and degradability No further relevant information available.

·        Bio-accumulative potential No further relevant information available.

·        Mobility in soil No further relevant information available.

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